banister fixing

 

To go with the rustic design of the house,
a length of rough sawn Rimu 150mm / 6in x 50mm / 2in
was cut down to 100mm / 4in x 50mm / 2in,
belt sanded and planed to a smooth finish.
  1. Mark the wall where the banister is going to be connected to at the top and bottom of the stairs 915mm / 36in (check your local building regulations for banister height from floor) up from the front tread of the second to top step and second to bottom step to the top of the hand rail.
  2. Locate the studs (frame) in the wall. If you do not have a stud finder this can be done by knocking on the wall with your knuckles. You can quickly identify the hollow sound between the studs and the more dense sound where the plaster board is attached to a stud.
  3. Rimu packers are made to keep the hand rail 50mm / 2in out from the wall and positioned at the bottom edge of the banister giving your fingers 50mm / 2in clearance over the top of them. The whole thing was screwed into place using the same method as the end boards of the dining table top. When selecting the bolt length take into account that the bolt is going through the plaster board before it screws into the wooden stud.
  4. Bore a hole deep enough to cover the bolt head and large enough to take the washer and socket that will be using to screw the bolt in with. Bore the second hole the rest of the way through the banister. This drill should be the size of the thread so that it is a loose but firm fit. The same drill size is used to drill through the spacer.

    banister fixing

  5. In newer houses in New Zealand the studs will be pine which is a soft wood. Therefore do not use a drill larger than the inner shaft of the tread of the bolt, if in doubt go for a smaller size drill. If the bolt is too hard to screw in, the hole can be re drilled bigger but if the drill is too big, the bolt thread will not grab the timber and the banister will be insecure.

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